Summary

for people ages 18 years and up (full criteria)
at Sacramento, California
study started
estimated completion

Description

Summary

This study aims to investigate whether the spacing of the interrupted deep (subdermal) sutures affects surgical wound cosmesis on the trunk and extremities. In other words, the investigator would like to determine which of the following yields a more cosmetically appealing scar: many closely approximated subdermal sutures or fewer, more widely spaced subdermal sutures. The investigator wishes to compare the effects of one versus two centimeter spacing between sutures.

Official Title

Interrupted Subdermal Suture Spacing During Linear Wound Closures and the Effect on Wound Cosmesis: a Randomized Evaluator Blinded Split Wound Comparative Effectiveness Trial

Details

Sutures are the standard of care in repairing cutaneous wounds. The majority of surgical reconstructions following a Mohs micrographic surgery and standard surgical excisions require two layers of sutures: a deep layer and a top layer. The deep layer dissolves naturally whereas the top layer must be removed.

This study aims to investigate whether the spacing of the interrupted deep (subdermal) sutures affects surgical wound cosmesis on the trunk and extremities. In other words, the investigator would like to determine which of the following yields a more cosmetically appealing scar: many closely approximated subdermal sutures or fewer, more widely spaced subdermal sutures. The investigator wishes to compare the effects of one versus two centimeter spacing between sutures. It is possible that fewer, more widely spaced sutures may leave more open space in the wound, leaving more tension to pull on those few sutures, possibly encouraging the wound to dehisce and make it harder to approximate the wound edges yielding a less cosmetically appealing scar compared to placing many closely approximated sutures which would decrease the tension and likely better approximate the wound edges yielding a more cosmetically appealing scar. On the other hand, we may find that suture spacing has no effect on wound cosmesis and that placing fewer, more widely spaced sutures is much more time efficient. The investigator may also find that the effect of suture spacing on wound cosmesis is dependent on wound tension. For example, perhaps the suture pacing would have no effect on the cosmesis of a wound under no tension, however, for a wound under high tension, it is possible that many closely approximated sutures would yield better cosmetic results for the reasons listed above.

Keywords

Interrupted Subdermal Suture Subdermal Suture Wound Closure Wound Cosmesis Vicryl absorbable suture Vicryl absorbable suture placed 2 cm apart Vicryl absorbable suture placed 1 cm apart

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 18 years and up

  • 18 years of age or older
  • Able to give informed consent themselves
  • Patient scheduled for cutaneous surgical procedure on the trunk and extremities with predicted primary closure
  • Willing to return for follow up visit.

You CAN'T join if...

  • Mentally handicapped
  • Unable to understand written and oral English
  • Incarceration
  • Under 18 years of age
  • Pregnant Women
  • Wounds with predicted closure length less than 4 cm

Location

  • University of California, Davis, Department of Dermatology accepting new patients
    Sacramento California 95816 United States

Details

Status
accepting new patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, Davis
Links
Sign up for this study
ID
NCT03327922
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated