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Asthma clinical trials at UC Davis

4 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Omalizumab on Exercise & Sleep in Asthma Patients

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study will assess the effect of omalizumab on exercise capacity, physical activity, and sleep quality after 24 weeks of treatment in participants with moderate to severe allergic asthma. Exercise capacity will be assessed using cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Physical activity and sleep quality will be assessed with a wearable physical activity and sleep monitor. The study will consist of a 4-week screening period, a 24-week treatment period, and a 4-week safety follow-up. Approximately 60 participants will be enrolled, and omalizumab will be dosed according to the approved United States Package Insert (USPI) dosing table.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine Roflumilast for Severe Asthma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study evaluates the effects of roflumilast on restoring response β2 adrenoreceptor agonists in low T2, obese asthmatics. One group of participants will receive roflumilast for 3 months, while the other will receive a placebo.

    Sacramento, California

  • The PrecISE research study is asking you to help us in discovering more effective ways to treat patients with severe asthma.

    “Join a severe asthma study unlike any other.”

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate several interventions given to participants with severe asthma. Interventions are administered in a crossover manner with 16-week treatment periods followed by 8 to 16 week washout.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Using Breath Elements to Determine Specific Virus Infection in Asthmatic Patients

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    Respiratory virus infections cause a majority of asthma exacerbations in the fall to spring months. Current diagnostic platforms for respiratory viruses have limitations including cost, availability, and invasiveness. The use of noninvasive breath collection to analyze breath metabolites may be used to differentiate virus-infected asthmatics from other causes of acute asthma exacerbations.

    Sacramento, California

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