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Breast Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis
22 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Study of Experimental Medicine Ipatasertib for Early Stage Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, pre-operative Phase II study designed to estimate the efficacy of ipatasertib combined with paclitaxel chemotherapy versus placebo combined with paclitaxel chemotherapy in women with Stage Ia - IIIa triple-negative breast adenocarcinoma. The anticipated time on study treatment is 12 weeks.

    Santa Barbara, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Medicine Pyrotinib For HER2-Positive Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Part 1: to assess the safety and tolerability of pyrotinib and to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of pyrotinib in patients with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced solid tumors (metastatic breast cancer, gastric cancer, or other solid tumors that have no targeted agent as standard of care). Part 2: to estimate the overall response rate (ORR) for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (mBC) and HER2 mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated at the RP2D (or MTD).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Individualized Radiotherapy Plans for Patients Receiving Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18-100

    This study is being conducted to investigate the effect of a more in-depth education plan for patients with breast cancer. Patients will be randomized to receive either the standard education plan during their breast cancer treatment or they will receive in-depth education about their breast cancer treatment. In order to see what kind of effect the different education plans have, patients will fill out three identical questionnaires during the course of treatment.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Study of Mammographic Breast Density For Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer Enrolled on Study A011502

    open to eligible females

    This phase III trial evaluates mammographic breast density in participants with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer enrolled on study A011502. High breast density has been shown to be a strong risk factor for developing breast cancer and decreasing breast density may decrease the risk for breast cancer. Participants treated with aspirin may show reduced breast density on a mammogram.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Experimental Combination of Cediranib and Olaparib in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies cediranib maleate in combination with olaparib in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body or cannot be removed by surgery, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cediranib maleate may also block the flow of oxygen to the tumor, and may help make the tumor more sensitive to olaparib.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Aspirin in Preventing Recurrence of Cancer in Patients With Breast Cancer After Chemotherapy

    “Effects of using aspirin after completing the usual chemotherapy, surgery and/or radiation therapy for breast cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing the cancer from coming back (recurrence) in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) breast cancer after chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiation therapy. Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is also being studied in cancer prevention. Giving aspirin may reduce the rate of cancer recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Cisplatin With/Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IV Triple-Negative and/or BRCA Mutation-Associated Breast Cancer

    “Chemotherapy with/without targeted chemotherapy in treatment of breast cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin works with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer and/or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer that has come back or has or has not spread to the brain. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known if cisplatin is more effective with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative and/or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Comparison of radiation or surgery and radiation for Breast cancer patients with lymph node cancer in the armpit (axillary) area

    “Comparison of Axillary (Armpit) lymph node cancer after breast cancer, chemotherapy and surgery. Surgery or surgery and radiation treatment”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies axillary lymph node dissection to see how well it works compared to axillary radiation therapy in treating patients with node-positive breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. Lymph node dissection may remove cancer cells that have spread to nearby lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. This study will evaluate whether radiation therapy is as effective as lymph node dissection.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicine and chemotherapy in treating patients metastatic cancer or tumors that cannot be removed by surgery

    “Study looking at side effects and the best dose of experimental medicine (veliparib) in combination with chemotherapy treatment”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of veliparib when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed by surgery and liver or kidney dysfunction. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib together with paclitaxel and carboplatin may kill more tumor cells.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    Sacramento, California

  • Experimental Treatment With "Carvedilol" to Avoid Heart Problems in Patients With HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    “This study will test whether carvedilol can reduce heart problems during your cancer treatment.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies how well carvedilol works in preventing cardiac toxicity in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. A beta-blocker, such as carvedilol, is used to treat heart failure and high blood pressure, and it may prevent the heart from side effects of chemotherapy.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx (closed to accrual 07/27/2018) 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands (closed to accrual 03/20/2018) 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location (closed to accrual) 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine (closed to accrual 05/10/2018) 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) (closed to accrual 10/17/2018) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary (closed to accrual 03/20/2018) 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not eligible 9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (closed to accrual 03/20/2018) 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors (closed to accrual 03/20/2018) 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma (closed to accrual 03/30/2018) 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma (closed to accrual 04/15/2019) 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder (closed to accrual 04/15/2019) 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation (closed to accrual 3/15/2019) 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) (closed to accrual 07/27/2018) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (formerly named: Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract.) 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung (closed to accrual 12/19/2017) 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma (closed to accrual 11/29/2018) 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors (closed to accrual 09/19/2018) 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma (closed to accrual 11/29/2018) 31. Adrenal cortical tumors (closed to accrual 06/27/2018) 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) (closed to accrual 12/22/2017) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] (closed to accrual 03/15/2019) 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (closed to accrual 02/06/2018) 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (closed to accrual 09/26/2018) 38. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) 39. Apocrine tumors/extramammary Paget's disease 40. Peritoneal mesothelioma 41. Basal cell carcinoma 42. Clear cell cervical cancer 43. Esthenioneuroblastoma 44. Endometrial carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Mullerian tumors) (closed to accrual) 45. Clear cell cervical endometrial cancer 46. Clear cell ovarian cancer 47. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) 48. Gallbladder cancer 49. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type 50. PD-L1 amplified tumors 51. Angiosarcoma 52. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor [PNET] should be enrolled in Cohort 22; prostatic neuroendocrine carcinomas should be enrolled into Cohort 53). Small cell lung cancer is not eligible 53. Treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC)

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Patients With Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Chemotherapy Before Surgery With an Experimental Immune System Therapy Cancer Drug

    “The purpose of this study is to compare any good and bad effects of the study drug Atezolizumab.”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without atezolizumab before surgery works in treating patients with newly diagnosed, stage II-III triple negative breast cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without atezolizumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Researching different medical imaging techniques for breast cancer

    “Comparing different medical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer.”

    open to eligible females ages 35 years and up

    The investigators have studied the potential of breast computed tomography (bCT) for breast imaging under an NIH-funded Biomedical Research Partnership (BRP) grant (R01 EB002138-10), and 4 breast CT scanners have been developed that have imaged over 600 women to date (under more than one IRB-approved protocol). The BRP grant cannot be renewed, and with this (resubmitted) R01 grant application, the investigators seek to finalize the investigators' research in breast CT - The specific aims have been significantly modified as a result of the first critique, and the investigators now focus on a narrower set of remaining issues. This version of the protocol will add breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the experimental procedures.

    Sacramento, California

  • Standard of Care Therapy With/Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery(SBRT) and/or Surgery to treat patients with breast cancer

    “Is standard of care therapy more effective when SBRT and/or surgery is added to the treatment of limited metastatic breast cancer?”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Standard or comprehensive radiation therapy to treat early-stage breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery

    “Is comprehensive radiation therapy more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with breast cancer?”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard or comprehensive radiation therapy in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer who have undergone surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether comprehensive radiation therapy is more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with breast cancer

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Studying the Safety and Effectiveness of Adding Experimental Ipatasertib to Treatment for Advanced Breast Cancer

    “Preliminary studies suggest that the combination of ipatasertib and paclitaxel may improve tumor responses.”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This multicenter, randomized, double-blind study will estimate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of ipatasertib combined with paclitaxel compared with placebo combined with paclitaxel in participants with inoperable locally advanced or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC), as measured by progression-free survival (PFS) in all participants and in participants with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-low tumors.

    San Luis Obispo, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • The Breast Cancer WEight Loss Study (BWEL Study)

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies whether weight loss in overweight and obese women may prevent breast cancer from coming back (recurrence). Previous studies have found that women who are overweight or obese when their breast cancer is found (diagnosed) have a greater risk of their breast cancer recurring, as compared to women who were thinner when their cancer was diagnosed. This study aims to test whether overweight or obese women who take part in a weight loss program after being diagnosed with breast cancer have a lower rate of cancer recurrence as compared to women who do not take part in the weight loss program. This study will help to show whether weight loss programs should be a part of breast cancer treatment.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • The WISDOM Study (wisdomstudy.org)

    “What is the best mammogram screening schedule for women? Clinical experts disagree. Help us find out!”

    open to eligible females ages 40-74

    Most physicians still use a one-size-fits-all approach to breast screening in which all women, regardless of their personal history, family history or genetics (except BRCA carriers) are recommended to have annual mammograms starting at age 40. Mammograms benefit women by detecting cancers early when they are easier to treat, but they are not perfect. Recent news stories have discussed some of the potential harms: large numbers of positive results that cause stressful recalls for additional mammograms and biopsies. With the current screening approach, half of the women who undergo annual screening for ten years will have at least one false positive biopsy. Potentially more important are cancer diagnoses for growths that might never come to clinical attention if left alone (called "overdiagnosis"). This can lead to unnecessary treatment. Even more concerning is evidence that up to 20% of breast cancers detected today may fall into the category of "overdiagnosis." This proposal compares annual screening with a risk-based breast cancer screening schedule, based upon each woman's personal risk of breast cancer. The investigators have designed the study to be inclusive of all, so that even women who might be nervous about being randomly assigned to receive a particular type of care (a procedure that is typical in clinical studies) will still be able to participate by choosing the type of care they receive. For participants in the risk-based screening arm, each woman will receive a personal risk assessment that includes her family and medical history, breast density measurement and tests for genes (mutations and variations) linked to the development of breast cancer. Women who have the highest personal risk of developing breast cancer will receive more frequent screening, while women with a lower personal risk would receive less frequent screening. No woman will be screened less than is recommended by the USPSTF breast cancer screening guidelines. If this study is successful, women will gain a realistic understanding of their personal risk of breast cancer as well as strategies to reduce their risk, and fewer women will suffer from the anxiety of false positive mammograms and unnecessary biopsies. The investigators believe this study has the potential to transform breast cancer screening in America.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Veliparib and Atezolizumab Either Alone or in Combination in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    “Experimental medicine (Veliparib), experimental immunotherapy (Atezolizumb) or combination for Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well olaparib with or without atezolizumab work in treating patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known whether giving olaparib with or without atezolizumab will work better in patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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