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Breast Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis

19 research studies open to eligible people

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  • A Study of Anti-Cancer Drug "BAY 1895344" with Usual Chemotherapy Treatment in Adults

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose, possible benefits and/or side effects of BAY 1895344 in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cisplatin and gemcitabine are chemotherapy drugs that stop the growth of tumor cells by killing the cells. Combining BAY 1895344 with chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) may be effective for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Atezolizumab With Usual Therapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of "targeted therapy" because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab may kill more tumor cells.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination With Chemotherapy & Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) versus placebo in combination with neoadjuvant (pre-surgery) chemotherapy and adjuvant (post-surgery) endocrine therapy in the treatment of adults who have high-risk early-stage estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+/HER2-) breast cancer. The primary study hypotheses are: 1) pembrolizumab is superior to placebo, both in combination with the protocol-specified neoadjuvant anticancer therapy, as assessed by pathological Complete Response (pCR) rate defined by the local pathologist, and 2) pembrolizumab is superior to placebo (both in combination with the protocol-specified neoadjuvant and adjuvant anticancer therapies) as assessed by Event-Free Survival (EFS) as determined by the investigator. The study is considered to have met its primary objective if pembrolizumab is superior to placebo with respect to either pCR (ypT0/Tis ypN0) or EFS.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Tucatinib vs. Placebo Combined With Ado-trastuzumab Emtansine (T-DM1) for HER2+ Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is being done to see if tucatinib with ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) works better than T-DM1 alone to help patients who have a specific type of breast cancer called HER2 positive breast carcinoma. The breast cancer in this study is either metastatic (spread into other parts of the body) or cannot be removed completely with surgery. Patients in this study will be randomly assigned to get either tucatinib or placebo (a pill with no medicine). This is a blinded study, so neither patients nor their doctors will know whether a patient gets tucatinib or placebo. All patients in the study will get T-DM1, a drug that is often used to treat this cancer. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. Patients will swallow tucatinib pills or placebo pills two times every day. Patients will get T-DM1 injections from the study site staff on the first day of every cycle.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Drug ONC-392 in Advanced Solid Tumors and Lung Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a First-in-Human Phase IA/IB open label dose escalation study of intravenous (IV) administration of ONC-392, a humanized anti-CTLA4 IgG1 monoclonal antibody, as single agent and in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors and non-small cell lung cancers.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Effectiveness and Safety of Experimental Pembrolizumab Plus Lenvatinib for Selected Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) and lenvatinib (E7080/MK-7902) in participants with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), ovarian cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC), glioblastoma (GBM), biliary tract cancers (BTC), or pancreatic cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Experimental Combination of Radiation Therapy and Olaparib For Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy with or without olaparib works in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy with or without olaparib may work better in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Trial of AMXI-5001 for Treatment in Patients With Advanced Malignancies (Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    ATLAS-101 is a Phase I/II clinical trial of AMXI-5001 in adult participants with advanced malignancies who have previously failed other therapies. The study has two phases. The purpose of Phase I (Dose Escalation) is to confirm the appropriate treatment dose and Phase II (Dose Expansion) is to characterize the safety and efficacy of AMXI-5001.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • Adding Radium Therapy to Treatment for Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel work in treating patients with advanced breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Radium-223 dichloride is a radioactive drug that behaves in a similar way to calcium and collects in cancer that has spread to the bones (bone metastases). The radioactive particles in radium-223 dichloride act on bone metastases, killing the tumor cells and reducing the pain that they can cause. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with metastatic breast cancer compared to paclitaxel alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Decreasing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients After Pre-Surgery Chemo and Targeted Therapy

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab and pertuzumab are both a form of "targeted therapy" because they work by attaching themselves to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When these drugs attach to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • Experimental Combination of Veliparib and Atezolizumab For Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    “Experimental medicine (Veliparib), experimental immunotherapy (Atezolizumb) or combination for Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well olaparib with or without atezolizumab work in treating patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and is not amenable to surgical resection (locally advanced unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known whether giving olaparib with or without atezolizumab will work better in patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Nab-Paclitaxel and Durvalumab With or Without Neoantigen Vaccine for Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without personalized synthetic long peptide vaccine (neoantigen vaccine) works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without neoantigen vaccine will work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    Sacramento, California

  • Experimental Study of a New Drug Combination - Copanlisib and Fulvestrant - in Postmenopausal Women With Advanced Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and how well copanlisib works when given together with fulvestrant in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and progressing after prior treatment. HER2 and ER are two types of proteins called receptors that can affect the growth of breast cancer cells. Additionally, investigators hope to learn from this study if tumor genetic information is important for predicting whether this type of breast cancer will respond to fulvestrant and copanlisib. Copanlisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. Giving copanlisib and fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with ER+ and HER2- breast cancer compared to fulvestrant alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • FEATURE Study: Using Imaging to Assess Bone-Dominant Metastatic Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well FDG-PET/CT works in assessing the response of patients with breast cancer that has spread to the bones or mostly to the bones (bone-dominant metastatic breast cancer). Diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET/CT, may work better in measuring breast cancer activity before and after treatment compared to other standard imaging tests.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • I-SPY TRIAL: Personalized Chemotherapy to Treat Different Types of Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Researching different medical imaging techniques for breast cancer

    “Comparing different medical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer.”

    open to eligible females ages 35 years and up

    The investigators have studied the potential of breast computed tomography (bCT) for breast imaging under an NIH-funded Biomedical Research Partnership (BRP) grant (R01 EB002138-10), and 4 breast CT scanners have been developed that have imaged over 600 women to date (under more than one IRB-approved protocol). The BRP grant cannot be renewed, and with this (resubmitted) R01 grant application, the investigators seek to finalize the investigators' research in breast CT - The specific aims have been significantly modified as a result of the first critique, and the investigators now focus on a narrower set of remaining issues. This version of the protocol will add breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the experimental procedures.

    Sacramento, California

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • The WISDOM Study (thewisdomstudy.org)

    “What is the best mammogram screening schedule for women? Clinical experts disagree. Help us find out!”

    open to eligible females ages 40-74

    Most physicians still use a one-size-fits-all approach to breast screening in which all women, regardless of their personal history, family history or genetics (except BRCA carriers) are recommended to have annual mammograms starting at age 40. Mammograms benefit women by detecting cancers early when they are easier to treat, but they are not perfect. Recent news stories have discussed some of the potential harms: large numbers of positive results that cause stressful recalls for additional mammograms and biopsies. With the current screening approach, half of the women who undergo annual screening for ten years will have at least one false positive biopsy. Potentially more important are cancer diagnoses for growths that might never come to clinical attention if left alone (called "overdiagnosis"). This can lead to unnecessary treatment. Even more concerning is evidence that up to 20% of breast cancers detected today may fall into the category of "overdiagnosis." This study compares annual screening with a risk-based breast cancer screening schedule, based upon each woman's personal risk of breast cancer. The investigators have designed the study to be inclusive of all, so that even women who might be nervous about being randomly assigned to receive a particular type of care (a procedure that is typical in clinical studies) will still be able to participate by choosing the type of care they receive. For participants in the risk-based screening arm, each woman will receive a personal risk assessment that includes her family and medical history, breast density measurement and tests for genes (mutations and variations) linked to the development of breast cancer. Women who have the highest personal risk of developing breast cancer will receive more frequent screening, while women with a lower personal risk would receive less frequent screening. No woman will be screened less than is recommended by the USPSTF breast cancer screening guidelines. If this study is successful, women will gain a realistic understanding of their personal risk of breast cancer as well as strategies to reduce their risk, and fewer women will suffer from the anxiety of false positive mammograms and unnecessary biopsies. The investigators believe this study has the potential to transform breast cancer screening in America.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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