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Diabetes clinical trials at UC Davis
3 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Study of the Effect of Orange Juice or Sugar-Sweetened Beverages on Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    “In this study, the study team will provide meals and either sugar-sweetened beverages or orange juice.”

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    The objectives of this proposal are to address the gaps in knowledge regarding the metabolic effects of consuming orange juice, the most frequently consumed fruit juice in this country, compared to sugar-sweetened beverage.

    Davis, California

  • DDPP

    “Dementia and Diabetes Prevention Program”

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    This is a multicenter, randomized 2-arm clinical trial of two lifestyle interventions varying in intensity and format, in 400 older African American and non-Hispanic whites at increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia in the East San Francisco Bay Area. The trial will include two lifestyle interventions that differ in intensity and format: 1. Aerobic Exercise (AEx) Intervention that involves aerobic activities with in-class walking workouts and tutorials and carried out at the East Oakland Sports Center (EOSC) and Tice Creek Fitness Center (TICE). 2. Dietary counseling to support adherence to the Mediterranean-Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet to encourage increased consumption of berries, green leafy and other vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, poultry, beans and olive oil, and to reduce consumption of fried/fast foods, red meat, whole fat cheese, sweets, butter and trans-fat margarines.

    Walnut Creek, California

  • Metabolic Effects of Sugar and Aspartame

    “What are the effects of consuming sugar- and aspartame-sweetened beverages with standardized diets?”

    open to eligible people ages 18-40

    It is not known whether consumption of excessive amounts of sugar can increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease or diabetes in the absence of increased food (caloric) intake and weight gain, nor whether the negative effects of sugar consumption are made worse when accompanied by weight gain. This study will investigate the effects of excess sugar when consumed with an energy-balanced diet that prevents weight gain, and the effects of excess sugar when consumed with a diet that can cause weight gain. The results will determine whether excess sugar consumption and excess caloric intake that lead to weight gain have independent and additive effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and will have the potential to influence dietary guidelines and public health policy.

    Davis, California and other locations

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