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Head and Neck Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis

11 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • UCDCC#272: IL-2, Radiotherapy, and Pembrolizumab in Patients Refractory to Checkpoint Blockade

    “This study is being done to test a new therapy for advanced stage solid tumor cancers involving a combination of radiation and injections.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I/II study that will evaluate the safety and toxicity of this combinatorial approach. Eligible patients >18 years of age with histologically proven metastatic NSCLC, melanoma, RCC, or HNSCC who have failed PD-1 / PD-L1 checkpoint blockade therapy will be enrolled. Patients must have a candidate treatment lesion (subcutaneous, nodal, or visceral) accessible and safe for radiotherapy and serial intralesional injections as specified by the protocol. They must also have at least one target lesion (distinct from treatment lesion and outside of treatment lesion radiation field) evaluable for response by RECIST. This study will consist of a phase I dose escalation using a standard 3+3 design to determine safety and MTD of intralesional IL-2 which will be dose escalated in conjunction with standard fixed doses of RT and Pembrolizumab. At the MTD there will be a phase II dose expansion which will incorporate a simon-two stage design to assess efficacy and safety. Patients will receive pembrolizumab and intralesional IL-2 in combination with hypofractionated radiotherapy.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin, or Cisplatin and Gemcitabine) for Advanced Solid Tumors With Emphasis on Urothelial Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose, possible benefits and/or side effects of BAY 1895344 in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cisplatin and gemcitabine are chemotherapy drugs that stop the growth of tumor cells by killing the cells. Combining BAY 1895344 with chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) may be effective for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-120

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective with cisplatin or cetuximab in treating oropharyngeal cancer. PURPOSE: This phase III trial is studying radiation therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab to see how well it works in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Vacaville, California and other locations

  • PK and Efficacy of ONC-392 in Monotherapy and in Combination of Anti-PD-1 in Advanced Solid Tumors and NSCLC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a First-in-Human Phase IA/IB/II open label dose escalation study of intravenous (IV) administration of ONC-392, a humanized anti-CTLA4 IgG1 monoclonal antibody, as single agent and in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors and non-small cell lung cancers.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • Atezolizumab Before Surgery for the Treatment of Regionally Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer With an Unknown or Historic Primary Site

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial tests whether atezolizumab works to shrink tumors before surgery in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer with an unknown or historic primary site that has spread to other places in the lymph nodes (regionally metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab before surgery may reduce the size of the tumor.

    Sacramento, California

  • Comparing High-Dose Cisplatin Every Three Weeks to Low-Dose Cisplatin Weekly When Combined With Radiation for Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial compares the effect of the combination of high-dose cisplatin every three weeks and radiation therapy versus low-dose cisplatin weekly and radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. This study is being done to find out if low-dose cisplatin given weekly together with radiation therapy is the same or better than high-dose cisplatin given every 3 weeks together with radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Comparing Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) Biopsy With Standard Neck Dissection for Patients With Early-Stage Oral Cavity Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well sentinel lymph node biopsy works and compares sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery to standard neck dissection as part of the treatment for early-stage oral cavity cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery is a procedure that removes a smaller number of lymph nodes from your neck because it uses an imaging agent to see which lymph nodes are most likely to have cancer. Standard neck dissection, such as elective neck dissection, removes many of the lymph nodes in your neck. Using sentinel lymph node biopsy surgery may work better in treating patients with early-stage oral cavity cancer compared to standard elective neck dissection.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing Docetaxel-Cetuximab or the Addition of an Immunotherapy Drug, Atezolizumab, to the Usual Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Head and Neck Cancer

    “You are invited to be a part of this study if you have Stage III or IV Oral Cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin, docetaxel, cetuximab, and/or atezolizumab after surgery in treating patients with high-risk stage III-IV head and neck cancer the begins in the thin, flat cells (squamous cell). Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to compare the usual treatment (radiation therapy with cisplatin chemotherapy) to using radiation therapy with docetaxel and cetuximab chemotherapy, and using the usual treatment plus an immunotherapy drug, atezolizumab.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • De-intensified Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy (Cisplatin) or Immunotherapy (Nivolumab) in Treating Patients With Early-Stage, HPV-Positive, Non-Smoking Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well a reduced dose of radiation therapy works with nivolumab compared to cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body (early-stage), and is not associated with smoking. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see if a reduced dose of radiation therapy and nivolumab works as well as standard dose radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Autologous Muscle Derived Cells for Treatment of Tongue Dysphagia

    “Contribute to discoveries that may improve healthcare for you, your family, and your community by volunteering for research!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial is to evaluate the safety of AMDC-GIR during the 24 months following 2 consecutive treatments of tongue dysphagia in male and female patients who have undergone surgery and/or chemo- and/or radiotherapy for squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Head and Neck Cancer research studies include .

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