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Head and Neck Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis
5 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Study of Pain Relief Using Gabapentin After Head and Neck Cancer Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery often have a lot of pain after surgery, which can lead to a need for a lot of narcotic pain medication. These medications can have many side effects that can make recovery more difficult including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, being overly sleepy, itchiness, inability to urinate, confusion, inability to have a bowel movement, longer time before being able to start walking. These side effects can make the hospital stay longer. The use of gabapentin, which is a non narcotic pain medication that focuses on nerve pain, has been used in smaller head and neck surgeries including removal of tonsils, sinus surgery, thyroid surgery. Studies in patients needing orthopedic or OB/Gyn surgery have shown improved pain control with gabapentin. Potential benefits to future patients include improved pain control, less narcotic associated side effects and faster functional recovery.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Study of Radiation Therapy With Experimental Durvalumab or Cetuximab For Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works with durvalumab or cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to a local and/or regional area of the body who cannot take cisplatin. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab or cetuximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known if radiation therapy with durvalumab will work better than the usual therapy of radiation therapy with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Antibody Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination With Standard of Care Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    “This research will study an experimental drug that weakens cancer cells. The immune system can then destroy those cancer cells.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will evaluate the safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in combination with platinum doublet neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) before surgery [neoadjuvant phase], followed by pembrolizumab alone after surgery [adjuvant phase] in participants with resectable stage II, IIIA, and resectable IIIB (T3-4N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The primary hypotheses of this study are that neoadjuvant pembrolizumab (vs. placebo) in combination with NAC, followed by surgery and adjuvant pembrolizumab (vs. placebo) will improve: 1) event free survival (EFS) by biopsy assessed by blinded central pathologist or by imaging using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors Version 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) assessed by blinded independent central review (BICR); and 2) overall survival (OS).

    Santa Rosa, California and other locations

  • International Nutrition Audit in FORegut TuMors

    “An observational study to understand nutritional experiences in patients with upper gastrointestinal tumors.”

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the current state of nutrition care and patient related outcomes in patients with head, neck and esophageal cancers in North America, Europe and Australia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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