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Hodgkin's Lymphoma clinical trials at UC Davis

13 research studies open to eligible people

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  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Chemotherapy Drugs CC-486, Lenalidomide, and Obinutuzumab for the Treatment of Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/Ib trial investigates the side effects of CC-486 and how well it works in combination with lenalidomide and obinutuzumab in treating patients with CD20 positive B-cell lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as CC-486, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and may also interfere with the development of tiny blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. Obinutuzumab is a type of antibody therapy that targets and attaches to the CD20 proteins found on follicular lymphoma cells as well as some healthy blood cells. Once attached to the CD20 protein the obinutuzumab is thought to work in different ways, including by helping the immune system destroy the cancer cells and by destroying the cancer cells directly. Giving CC-486 with lenalidomide and obinutuzumab may improve response rates, quality, and duration, and minimize adverse events in patients with B-cell lymphoma.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Study of Ensartinib in Treating Cancer with Genomic Alterations in Kids

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ensartinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with ALK or ROS1 genomic alterations that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Ensartinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • An Experimental Combination of Atezolizumab, Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Rituximab For Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and rituximab and to see how well they work in treating patients with transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and rituximab may work better in treating patients with transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Combination chemotherapy and experimental immunotherapy in the treatment of Stage III-IV HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma

    “Does adding immunotherapy (brentuximab vedotin) to combination chemotherapy (AVD) better treat (HIV)-associated Hodgkin lymphoma?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage III-IV human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated Hodgkin lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth by finding cancer cells and causing them to die. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, vinblastine sulfate, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving brentuximab vedotin together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.

    Clamart, and other locations

  • Experimental Erdafitinib for Relapsed/Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well erdafitinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment with FGFR mutations. Erdafitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Experimental Immunotherapy (Nivolumab or Brentuximab Vedotin) With Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This phase III trial compares immunotherapy drugs (nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin) when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage III or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The addition of nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin to combination chemotherapy may shrink the cancer or extend the time without disease symptoms coming back.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    “Study looking at stem cell gene therapy to treat patients with HIV and lymphoma”

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Genetic Testing to Determine Therapy For Pediatric Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in treating patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma that has returned

    “Study of Immunotherapy (Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab) looking at side effects and best dose for treatment of lymphoma”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide and blinatumomab when given together in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Blinatumomab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Study of Experimental STRO-001 in Patients With Advanced B-Cell Malignancies (Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    First-in-human Phase 1 trial to study the safety, pharmacokinetics and preliminary efficacy of STRO-001 given intravenously every 3 weeks.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Zevalin (radioimmunotherapy) before stem cell transplant in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    “Is radioimmunotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma?”

    open to eligible people ages 19-75

    This phase II trial studies how well ibritumomab tiuxetan before donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Also, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and TLI before the transplant together with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Sacramento, California

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