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Immunotherapy clinical trials at UC Davis

5 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Immunotherapy Treatment After Surgery and Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    “Can immunotherapy help treat lung cancer after surgery and chemotherapy?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III ALCHEMIST treatment trial studies how well nivolumab after surgery and chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of TTX-030 With Immunotherapy and/or Chemotherapy in Advanced Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-110

    This is a phase 1/1b study of TTX-030 in combination therapy, an antibody that inhibits CD39 enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of pro-inflammatory adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduction of immunosuppressive adenosine, which may change the tumor microenvironment and promote anti-tumor immune response. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity of TTX-030 in combination with immunotherapy and/or standard chemotherapies.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Combination chemotherapy and experimental immunotherapy in the treatment of Stage III-IV HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma

    “Does adding immunotherapy (brentuximab vedotin) to combination chemotherapy (AVD) better treat (HIV)-associated Hodgkin lymphoma?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage III-IV human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated Hodgkin lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth by finding cancer cells and causing them to die. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, vinblastine sulfate, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving brentuximab vedotin together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.

    Clamart, and other locations

  • Experimental Immunotherapy (Nivolumab or Brentuximab Vedotin) With Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This phase III trial compares immunotherapy drugs (nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin) when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage III or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The addition of nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin to combination chemotherapy may shrink the cancer or extend the time without disease symptoms coming back.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing the Use of the Immunotherapy Drugs Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Plus Radiation Therapy in Glioblastoma (Brain Tumor)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial compares the usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide to radiation therapy in combination with immunotherapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed MGMT unmethylated glioblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy photons to kill tumor and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Temozolomide, may not work as well for the treatment of tumors that have the unmethylated MGMT. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies called immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is possible that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work better at time of first diagnosis as opposed to when tumor comes back. Giving radiation therapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab may lengthen the time without brain tumor returning or growing and may extend patients' life compared to usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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