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Liver Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis

4 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Experimental ET140203 T Cells in Adults With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (Liver Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Open-label, dose escalation, multi-center, Phase I / II study to assess the safety of an autologous T-cell product (ET140203) in adult subjects with Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-positive/Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A-2-positive advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Children and Young Adults With Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This partially randomized phase II/III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Combination of Sorafenib and Nivolumab for Unresectable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the best dose and side effects of sorafenib tosylate and nivolumab in treating patients with liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or to other places in the body (metastatic). Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sorafenib tosylate and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with liver cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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