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Malignant Solid Neoplasm clinical trials at UC Davis
7 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine Olaparib For Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with glioma, cholangiocarcinoma, or solid tumors with IDH1 or IDH2 mutations that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (refractory). Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 and Irinotecan Hydrochloride combination for solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed

    “Experimental targeted cancer therapy and chemotherapy combination for tumors that have returned, spread, or cannot be removed”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of VX-970 and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). VX-970 and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors compared to ipilimumab with nivolumab alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicines to treat patients with advanced tumors or lung cancer that have not responded to standard treatment

    “Experimental treatment with Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium for advanced tumors or lung cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of methoxyamine when given together with cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors or mesothelioma that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with standard treatment (advanced), or mesothelioma that does not respond to pemetrexed disodium and cisplatin or carboplatin (refractory). Methoxyamine may shrink the tumor and may also help cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving methoxyamine together with cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium may be a better treatment for solid tumors or mesothelioma than methoxyamine and pemetrexed disodium.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy for sarcomas, Wilms tumor, rare tumors that have come back, did not respond to treatment, or are newly diagnosed

    “How well does targeted therapy, (cabozantinib-s-malate) work in treating younger patients with sarcomas and rare tumors?”

    open to eligible people ages 2-30

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Trametinib (targeted chemotherapy) in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With or Without Hepatic Dysfunction

    “Study looking at experimental, targeted chemotherapy (Trametinib) to treat advanced cancers”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of trametinib in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) with or without liver (hepatic) dysfunction. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking proteins needed for cell growth. When these proteins are blocked, the growth of cancer cells may be stopped and the cancer cells will then die. Hepatic dysfunction is frequently found in patients with advanced cancer and usually prevents patients from receiving standard treatments or from participating in clinical trials. Patients may also need dose adjustments or absorb drugs differently. Trametinib may be a better treatment for patients with advanced cancers and hepatic dysfunction.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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