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Neoplasms clinical trials at UC Davis

30 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of CC-95251, a Monoclonal Antibody Directed Against SIRPα, in Subjects With Advanced Solid and Hematologic Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and preliminary clinical activity of CC-95251 as a single agent and in combination with cetuximab and rituximab in participants with advanced solid and hematologic cancers.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Combination Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed DAWT and Relapsed FHWT (Cancer)

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumors (DAWT) or favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWT) that have come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy regimens such as UH-3 (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan) and ICE/Cyclo/Topo (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, and topotecan) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial may help doctors find out what effects, good and/or bad, regimen UH-3 has on patients with newly diagnosed DAWT and standard risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with only 2 drugs for the initial WT) and regimen ICE/Cyclo/Topo has on patients with high and very high risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with 3 or more drugs for the initial WT).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of KPG-818 in Hematological Malignancies (Blood & Immune System Cancers)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, multicenter, open-label, multiple-ascending dose study to evaluate the safety, PK, and preliminary clinical activity of KPG-818 in combination with dexamethasone in adult subjects with multiple myeloma (MM), and KPG-818 as monotherapy in subjects with other selected hematological malignancies, including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATL), indolent lymphoma, such as follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/ small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), etc. This study will assist in identifying appropriate, well tolerated doses that can be administered in subsequent studies in subjects with selected hematological malignancies.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of M3814, Radium-223 Dichloride & Avelumab in Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the best dose of M3814 when given together with radium-223 dichloride or with radium-223 dichloride and avelumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer that had spread to other places in the body (metastatic). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to find out the better treatment between radium-223 dichloride alone, radium-223 dichloride in combination with M3814, or radium-223 dichloride in combination with both M3814 and avelumab, to lower the chance of prostate cancer growing or spreading in the bone, and if this approach is better or worse than the usual approach for advanced prostate cancer not responsive to hormonal therapy.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Oral LY3410738 in Advanced Hematologic Malignancies With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multi-center Phase 1 study of LY3410738, an oral, covalent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) inhibitor, in patients with IDH1 and/or IDH2-mutant advanced hematologic malignancies who may have received standard therapy

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of SGN-STNV in Advanced Solid Tumors

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will look at a drug called SGN-STNV to find out whether it is safe for patients with solid tumors. It will study SGN-STNV to find out what its side effects are. A side effect is anything the drug does besides treating cancer. It will also study how well SGN-STNV works to treat solid tumors. The study will have two parts. Part A of the study will find out how much SGN-STNV should be given to patients. Part B will use the dose found in Part A to find out how safe SGN-STNV is and if it works to treat certain types of solid tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of TTX-030 With Immunotherapy and/or Chemotherapy in Advanced Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-110

    This is a phase 1/1b study of TTX-030 in combination therapy, an antibody that inhibits CD39 enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of pro-inflammatory adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduction of immunosuppressive adenosine, which may change the tumor microenvironment and promote anti-tumor immune response. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity of TTX-030 in combination with immunotherapy and/or standard chemotherapies.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Vimseltinib for Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a multicenter Phase 3 clinical study, which aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an investigational drug called vimseltinib for the treatment of tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) in cases where surgical removal of the tumor is not an option. The study consists of two parts. In Part 1, eligible study participants will be assigned to receive either vimseltinib or matching placebo for 24 weeks. A number of assessments will be carried out during the course of the study, including physical examinations, blood tests, imaging studies, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires. MRI scans will be used to evaluate the response of the tumors to the treatment. Participants assigned to placebo in Part 1 will have the option to receive vimseltinib for Part 2. Part 2 is a long-term treatment phase in which all participants receive open-label vimseltinib.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Trial of AMXI-5001 for Treatment in Patients With Advanced Malignancies (Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    ATLAS-101 is a Phase I/II clinical trial of AMXI-5001 in adult participants with advanced malignancies who have previously failed other therapies. The study has two phases. The purpose of Phase I (Dose Escalation) is to confirm the appropriate treatment dose and Phase II (Dose Expansion) is to characterize the safety and efficacy of AMXI-5001.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • Adding Cabozantinib to Usual Treatment for Advanced Kidney Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares the usual treatment (treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab followed by nivolumab alone) to treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab, followed by nivolumab with cabozantinib in patients with untreated renal cell carcinoma that has spread to other parts of the body. The addition of cabozantinib to the usual treatment may make it work better. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known how well the combination of cabozantinib and nivolumab after initial treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab works in treating patients with renal cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Adding Radium Therapy to Treatment for Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel work in treating patients with advanced breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Radium-223 dichloride is a radioactive drug that behaves in a similar way to calcium and collects in cancer that has spread to the bones (bone metastases). The radioactive particles in radium-223 dichloride act on bone metastases, killing the tumor cells and reducing the pain that they can cause. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with metastatic breast cancer compared to paclitaxel alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 and Irinotecan Hydrochloride combination for solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed

    “Experimental targeted cancer therapy and chemotherapy combination for tumors that have returned, spread, or cannot be removed”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). M6620 and irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Children and Young Adults With Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This partially randomized phase II/III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Combination of AMG 510 and Trametinib for Advanced Solid Tumors With KRAS p.G12C Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    To evaluate the safety and tolerability of sotorasib administered in investigational regimens in adult participants with KRAS p.G12C mutant advanced solid tumors.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Erdafitinib for Relapsed/Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well erdafitinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment with FGFR mutations. Erdafitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells with FGFR mutations by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    Sacramento, California

  • How a Drug Affects Low Platelet Counts in Pediatric Patients with Solid Tumors Receiving Chemotherapy

    “Pilot Trial of Eltrombopag in Children Undergoing Chemotherapy for Malignant Solid Tumors”

    open to eligible people ages 1-18

    Primary Objective: To assess safety of eltrombopag in pediatric patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for malignant solid tumors. Secondary Objectives: To assess the efficacy of eltrombopag in increasing platelet count up to 2 weeks after completion of chemotherapy in pediatric patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for malignant solid tumors. Hypothesis: The hypothesis is that eltrombopag an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist will increase the platelet count safely and efficaciously in children having chemotherapy induced thrombocytopenia while on therapy for solid tumors.

    Sacramento, California

  • Mobile Health and Social Media Physical Activity Intervention in Adolescent and Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 15-20

    This phase III trial compares a multi-component mobile health and social media physical activity intervention versus wearing a physical activity tracker alone among adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors. Regular physical activity helps maintain healthy weight, energy levels, and health. Adolescents and young adults who complete treatment for cancer are often less active. They may gain weight and have more health problems compared to people the same age who have not had treatment for cancer. Comparing the 2 programs will help researchers learn how to increase physical activity levels over time and also how changes in physical activity levels affect health and quality of life over time.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Oregovomab Plus Chemo in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Following Optimal Debulking Surgery

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    Study to compare the safety and efficacy of oregovomab versus placebo, administered in combination with specific cycles of a standard six-cycle chemotherapy regimen (paclitaxel and carboplatin), for the treatment of subjects with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer who have undergone optimal debulking.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Study of experimental monoclonal antibodies in Advanced Cancers

    “Experimental medicine as a monotherapy or in combination”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objectives in the dose escalation phase are to evaluate safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) in order to determine the selected dose level(s) for expansion of REGN3767 as monotherapy and in combination with cemiplimab in patients with advanced malignancies, including lymphoma. The primary objectives in the dose expansion phase are to assess preliminary anti-tumor activity of REGN3767 alone and in combination with cemiplimab (separately by cohort) as measured by objective response rate (ORR).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing Sacituzumab Govitecan Therapy in Patients With HER2-Negative Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the effect of sacituzumab govitecan in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to the brain (brain metastases). Sacituzumab govitecan is a monoclonal antibody, called sacituzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called govitecan. Sacituzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches to specific molecules on the surface of cancer cells, known as Trop-2 receptors, and delivers govitecan to kill them. Giving sacituzumab govitecan may shrink the cancer in the brain and/or extend the time until the cancer gets worse.

    Martinez, California and other locations

  • Testing the Anti Cancer Drugs Telaglenastat and Sapanisertib in Advanced Lung Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of CB-839 HCl when given together with sapanisertib in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). CB-839 HCl and sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing the Combination of Two Anti-Cancer Drugs for Treating Advanced Solid Tumors with HER2 Expression

    “Volunteer for the DASH Trial and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The dose escalation phase of this trial identifies the best dose and safety of ceralasertib (AZD6738) when given in combination with trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201a) in treating patients with solid tumors that have a change (mutation) in the HER2 gene or protein and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). The dose expansion phase (phase Ib) of this trial compares how colorectal and gastroesophageal cancers with HER2 mutation respond to treatment with a combination of ceralasertib and trastuzumab deruxtecan versus trastuzumab deruxtecan alone. Trastuzumab deruxtecan is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called deruxtecan. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers deruxtecan to kill them. Ceralasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Two Studies for Patients With High Risk Prostate Cancer Testing Less Intense Treatment for Patients With a Low Gene Risk Score ...

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares less intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer and low gene risk score. This trial also compares more intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in patients with high risk prostate cancer and high gene risk score. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a shorter hormone therapy treatment may work the same at controlling prostate cancer compared to the usual 24 month hormone therapy treatment in patients with low gene risk score. Adding apalutamide to the usual treatment may increase the length of time without prostate cancer spreading as compared to the usual treatment in patients with high gene risk score.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Long Term Health in Children and Adolescents With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 8-16

    This randomized clinical phase III trial studies how well web-based physical activity intervention works in improving long term health in children and adolescents with cancer. Regular physical activity after receiving treatment for cancer may help to maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels and overall health.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Collection of Tissue Samples for Cancer Research

    “Collection of samples (cancerous tissue, normal tissue, blood) and related medical information for use in cancer research”

    open to eligible people ages 2 months and up

    Background: -Patients who are being evaluated and/or treated at the NIH Clinical Center and adult patients at participating sites will be entered onto this tissue procurement protocol for collection of tissue specimens. Objectives: - To obtain samples from adult and pediatric patients for research purposes from tests and procedures that are done as required by the primary research protocol(s) to which a patient is enrolled or as part of their standard-of-care treatment. - To obtain samples for research purposes from non-surgical procedures, such as percutaneous biopsies, performed for the sole purpose of obtaining tissue specimens or biological fluids for this protocol. Eligibility: -Adult patients (18 years of age and older) and pediatric patients (younger than 18 years of age) who are being evaluated for and/or treated for cancer at the NIH Clinical Center participating sites. Design: - This is a multicenter tissue procurement protocol with NCI as the coordinating center. - For adult patients: specimens for research purposes, as outlined in this protocol, will be obtained from tests and procedures that are done as required by the primary research protocols to which a patient is enrolled or as part of their standard-of-care treatment. Non-surgical procedures, such as percutaneous biopsies, may also be performed for the sole purpose of obtaining tissue specimens or biological fluids for this protocol. Tissues and biological fluids to be procured may include but are not limited to blood, serum, urine, tumor tissue, normal tissue, pleural fluid, CSF, saliva, bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL), circulating tumor cells, hair follicles, and bone marrow. These specimens will be stored with unique identifiers and used to perform only those research studies that are outlined in this protocol. - For pediatric patients: tumor biopsy/resection tissue used for pediatric preclinical model development will only be from tissue already being obtained as part of a procedure necessary for the patient s clinical care or as part of a primary research protocol; blood specimens will be collected as part of a blood collection already scheduled for the patient s clinical care or as part of the planned pre-procedure bloodwork; volumes collected will not exceed institutional research limits. - Given the risks associated with any invasive procedure, such as tumor biopsy, the procedure will be discussed in detail with the patients and their parents/guardian (as indicated), including the side effects, prior to obtaining a separate consent for each procedure. A separate consent will not be signed prior to obtaining samples by minimally invasive measures, such as venipuncture. - This study has two separate consent forms at the NIH Clinical Center: one for adult patients to donate specimens for ongoing research on assay development and studies of molecular pathways, and one for adult and age-appropriate pediatric patients to donate samples for the generation of preclinical models. The study also has consent form templates for adult and pediatric patients at participating sites to donate specimens to create preclinical models. - Patients may remain on study for the duration of their consent or completion of the planned procedure, whichever comes first.

    Iowa City, Iowa and other locations

  • Enrollment on the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) of the Children s Oncology Group

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Background: - The Children s Oncology Group has established a research network, the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN), to collect information about children with cancer and other conditions that are benign but involve abnormal cell growth in order to help doctors and scientists better understand childhood cancer. The CCRN's goal is to collect clinical information about every child diagnosed with cancer and similar conditions in the United States and Canada, to allow researchers to study patterns, characteristics, and causes of childhood cancer. The information can also help researchers study the causes of childhood cancer. To expand the CCRN, parents of children who have been diagnosed with cancer will be asked to provide information about themselves and their child for research purposes. Objectives: - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer to enter their names and certain information concerning their child into the Childhood Cancer Research Network. - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer for permission to be contacted in the future to consider participating in non-therapeutic and prevention research studies involving the parents and/or the child. Eligibility: - Parents of children who have been seen at or treated by a hospital that is a member of the Children s Oncology Group. Design: - Parents will provide permission to have personal information sent from their child s hospital to the CCRN, including the child and parents' names; child's gender, birth date, race, and ethnicity; information about the disease; and the treating institution. - Parents will also give permission for CCRN to contact the diagnostic laboratory to obtain specific information about the tumor or cancer cells. - Parents will be asked if they are willing to be contacted in the future to consider participating in CCRN research studies, and will provide contact information (name, home address, and telephone number) to be entered in the CCRN. - Parents or patients who change their minds about having information available in the CCRN can ask the treatment institution to restrict access to the identifying information. Parents or patients who refuse to have information included in the CCRN or be contacted in the future will still be able to enter clinical cancer research studies.

    Bethesda, Maryland

  • EVERYCHILD PROTOCOL

    “A REGISTRY, ELIGIBILITY SCREENING, BIOLOGY AND OUTCOME STUDY”

    open to eligible people ages up to 25 years

    This study gathers health information for the Project: Every Child for younger patients with cancer. Gathering health information over time from younger patients with cancer may help doctors find better methods of treatment and on-going care.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Neoplasms research studies include .

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