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Prostate Cancer clinical trials at UC Davis

12 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of a New Drug Combination to Treat Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies whether adding apalutamide to the usual treatment improves outcome in patients with lymph node positive prostate cancer after surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-ray to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Androgens, or male sex hormones, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as apalutamide, may help stop or reduce the growth of prostate cancer cell growth by blocking the attachment of androgen to its receptors on cancer cells, a mechanism similar to stopping the entrance of a key into its lock. Adding apalutamide to the usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy after surgery may stabilize prostate cancer and prevent it from spreading and extend time without disease spreading compared to the usual approach.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Apalutamide for High‑Risk, Localized or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine if treatment with apalutamide plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before and after radical prostatectomy (RP) with pelvic lymph node dissection (pLND) in participants with high-risk localized or locally advanced prostate cancer results in an improvement in pathological complete response (pCR) rate and metastasis-free survival (MFS) as compared to placebo plus ADT.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Combination of Enzalutamide and Indomethacin For Recurrent or Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    “This is a research study for patients with prostate cancer that has become resistant to first-line androgen deprivation therapy.”

    open to eligible males ages 19 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects of enzalutamide and indomethacin and to see how well they work in treating patients with prostate cancer that does not respond to treatment with hormones, has come back, or has spread from where it started to other places in the body. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using enzalutamide and indomethacin may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and/or blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Study of M3814, Radium-223 Dichloride & Avelumab in Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the best dose of M3814 when given together with radium-223 dichloride or with radium-223 dichloride and avelumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer that had spread to other places in the body (metastatic). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to find out the better treatment between radium-223 dichloride alone, radium-223 dichloride in combination with M3814, or radium-223 dichloride in combination with both M3814 and avelumab, to lower the chance of prostate cancer growing or spreading in the bone, and if this approach is better or worse than the usual approach for advanced prostate cancer not responsive to hormonal therapy.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Drug ONC-392 in Advanced Solid Tumors and Lung Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a First-in-Human Phase IA/IB open label dose escalation study of intravenous (IV) administration of ONC-392, a humanized anti-CTLA4 IgG1 monoclonal antibody, as single agent and in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors and non-small cell lung cancers.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine Niraparib for Men With High Risk Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well niraparib, when given before surgery, works in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body (localized) and alterations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair pathways. Niraparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Trial of AMXI-5001 for Treatment in Patients With Advanced Malignancies (Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    ATLAS-101 is a Phase I/II clinical trial of AMXI-5001 in adult participants with advanced malignancies who have previously failed other therapies. The study has two phases. The purpose of Phase I (Dose Escalation) is to confirm the appropriate treatment dose and Phase II (Dose Expansion) is to characterize the safety and efficacy of AMXI-5001.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • Experimental Combination of Olaparib and Radium-223 For Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer That Has Spread

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of olaparib and how well it works with radium Ra 223 dichloride in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to the bone and other places in the body (metastatic). PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving olaparib and radium Ra 223 dichloride may help treat patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental Standard Systemic Therapy With or Without Surgery or Radiation For Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies how well standard systemic therapy with or without definitive treatment (prostate removal surgery or radiation therapy) works in treating participants with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Addition of prostate removal surgery or radiation therapy to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Study on Experimental Olaparib Plus Abiraterone for Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18-99

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety (including evaluating side effects) of combination of olaparib and abiraterone versus placebo and abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who have received no prior cytotoxic chemotherapy or new hormonal agents (NHAs) at metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) stage.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Two Studies for Patients With High Risk Prostate Cancer Testing Less Intense Treatment for Patients With a Low Gene Risk Score ...

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares less intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer and low gene risk score. This trial also compares more intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in patients with high risk prostate cancer and high gene risk score. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a shorter hormone therapy treatment may work the same at controlling prostate cancer compared to the usual 24 month hormone therapy treatment in patients with low gene risk score. Adding apalutamide to the usual treatment may increase the length of time without prostate cancer spreading as compared to the usual treatment in patients with high gene risk score.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Prostate Cancer research studies include .

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