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Sarcoma clinical trials at UC Davis
6 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Registry Study Called the International Pleuropulmonary Blastoma Registry for PPB, DICER1, and Associated Conditions

    “This Registry Study is for individuals that have a condition which may be associated with a gene called DICER1.”

    open to all eligible people

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the lung presenting in early childhood. Type I PPB is a purely cystic lesion, Type II is a partially cystic, partially solid tumor, Type III is a completely solid tumor. Treatment of children with PPB is at the discretion of the treating institution. This study builds off of the 2009 study and will also seek to enroll individuals with DICER1-associated conditions, some of whom may present only with the DICER1 gene mutation, which will help the Registry understand how these tumors and conditions develop, their clinical course and the most effective treatments.

    Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Enrollment on the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) of the Children s Oncology Group

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Background: - The Children s Oncology Group has established a research network, the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN), to collect information about children with cancer and other conditions that are benign but involve abnormal cell growth in order to help doctors and scientists better understand childhood cancer. The CCRN's goal is to collect clinical information about every child diagnosed with cancer and similar conditions in the United States and Canada, to allow researchers to study patterns, characteristics, and causes of childhood cancer. The information can also help researchers study the causes of childhood cancer. To expand the CCRN, parents of children who have been diagnosed with cancer will be asked to provide information about themselves and their child for research purposes. Objectives: - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer to enter their names and certain information concerning their child into the Childhood Cancer Research Network. - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer for permission to be contacted in the future to consider participating in non-therapeutic and prevention research studies involving the parents and/or the child. Eligibility: - Parents of children who have been seen at or treated by a hospital that is a member of the Children s Oncology Group. Design: - Parents will provide permission to have personal information sent from their child s hospital to the CCRN, including the child and parents' names; child's gender, birth date, race, and ethnicity; information about the disease; and the treating institution. - Parents will also give permission for CCRN to contact the diagnostic laboratory to obtain specific information about the tumor or cancer cells. - Parents will be asked if they are willing to be contacted in the future to consider participating in CCRN research studies, and will provide contact information (name, home address, and telephone number) to be entered in the CCRN. - Parents or patients who change their minds about having information available in the CCRN can ask the treatment institution to restrict access to the identifying information. Parents or patients who refuse to have information included in the CCRN or be contacted in the future will still be able to enter clinical cancer research studies.

    Bethesda, Maryland

  • Experimental Antibody Atezolizumab in cancer: Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma

    “Study of experimental medicine for non-treatable alveolar soft part cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 2 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works in treating patients with alveolar soft part sarcoma that has not been treated, has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors compared to ipilimumab with nivolumab alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    open to eligible people ages up to 29 years

    This research trial studies kidney tumors in younger patients. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue, blood, and urine from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Targeted therapy for sarcomas, Wilms tumor, rare tumors that have come back, did not respond to treatment, or are newly diagnosed

    “How well does targeted therapy, (cabozantinib-s-malate) work in treating younger patients with sarcomas and rare tumors?”

    open to eligible people ages 2-30

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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