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Leukemia clinical trials at UC Davis
23 research studies open to eligible people

  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Research Study Investigating the Efficiency of Experimental Crenolanib With Chemotherapy in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    “You are being asked to take part in this study because you have acute myeloid leukemia even though you had previous treatment(s).”

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This is a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study designed to evaluate the efficacy of crenolanib administered following salvage chemotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy, post bone marrow transplantation and as maintenance in relapsed/refractory AML subjects with FLT3 activating mutation.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Cirmtuzumab and Ibrutinib For B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is Phase 1b/2 study to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the investigational drug, cirmtuzumab, when given in combination with ibrutinib in patients with B-cell lymphoid malignancies. Cirmtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that attaches to a protein (called ROR 1) that is found on hematologic tumor cells. ROR1 has been shown to play a role in cell signaling that cause leukemia and lymphoma cells to grow and survive. ROR1 is rarely found on healthy cells.

    Duarte, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Combination Treatment Versus Azacitidine For Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental FT-2102 in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome (types of blood system cancer)

    “This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Phase 1/2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (single agent) and FT-2102 + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 6 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (as a single agent) and FT-2102 + azacitidine (combination) on various AML/MDS disease states.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Inotuzumab Ozogamicin for Younger Patients With CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Medicine Crenolanib vs Midostaurin For Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    A phase III randomized multi-center study designed to compare the efficacy of crenolanib with that of midostaurin when administered following induction chemotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in newly diagnosed AML subjects with FLT3 mutation. About 510 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either crenolanib in addition to standard first line treatment of AML (chemotherapy and if eligible, transplantation) (arm A) or midostaurin and standard treatment (arm B). Potentially eligible subjects will be registered and tested for the presence of FLT3 mutation. Once the FLT3 mutation status is confirmed and additional eligibility is established, subject will be randomized and enter into the treatment phase.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Medicines Venetoclax and Alvocidib For Relapsed (recurring) Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    An open-label, dose-escalation study to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK), to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of alvocidib with venetoclax when co-administered in participants with relapsed or refractory (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Activity of Experimental ABBV-744 For Metastatic Prostate Cancer and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, Phase 1, dose-escalation (Segment 1) and expansion (Segment 2) study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase two dose (RPTD), and to assess the safety, preliminary efficacy, and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of ABBV-744 for participants with metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) and relapsed/refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Effectiveness of Experimental Uproleselan With Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (blood cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This study will evaluate the efficacy of uproleselan (GMI-1271), a specific E-selectin antagonist, in combination with chemotherapy to treat relapsed/refractory AML, compared to chemotherapy alone. The safety of uproleselan when given with chemotherapy will also be investigated in patients with relapsed/refractory AML

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Venetoclax in Combination With Cobimetinib and Venetoclax in Combination With Idasanutlin in Patients Aged >/= 60 Ye...

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    The primary objective for this study is to assess the safety and tolerability as well as preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in combination with cobimetinib, and venetoclax in combination with idasanutlin in patients >/= 60 years of age with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (R/R) AML who are not eligible for cytotoxic therapy.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    “Is standard combination chemotherapy more effective than blinatumomab (a type of immunotherapy) in treating leukemia?”

    open to eligible people ages 1-30

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Immunotherapy with blinatumomab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Combination Treatment for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    “Do you have b-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and have relapsed or are no longer responding or benefiting from the treatment?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and blinatumomab work in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sacramento, California

  • Enrollment on the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) of the Children s Oncology Group

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Background: - The Children s Oncology Group has established a research network, the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN), to collect information about children with cancer and other conditions that are benign but involve abnormal cell growth in order to help doctors and scientists better understand childhood cancer. The CCRN's goal is to collect clinical information about every child diagnosed with cancer and similar conditions in the United States and Canada, to allow researchers to study patterns, characteristics, and causes of childhood cancer. The information can also help researchers study the causes of childhood cancer. To expand the CCRN, parents of children who have been diagnosed with cancer will be asked to provide information about themselves and their child for research purposes. Objectives: - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer to enter their names and certain information concerning their child into the Childhood Cancer Research Network. - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer for permission to be contacted in the future to consider participating in non-therapeutic and prevention research studies involving the parents and/or the child. Eligibility: - Parents of children who have been seen at or treated by a hospital that is a member of the Children s Oncology Group. Design: - Parents will provide permission to have personal information sent from their child s hospital to the CCRN, including the child and parents' names; child's gender, birth date, race, and ethnicity; information about the disease; and the treating institution. - Parents will also give permission for CCRN to contact the diagnostic laboratory to obtain specific information about the tumor or cancer cells. - Parents will be asked if they are willing to be contacted in the future to consider participating in CCRN research studies, and will provide contact information (name, home address, and telephone number) to be entered in the CCRN. - Parents or patients who change their minds about having information available in the CCRN can ask the treatment institution to restrict access to the identifying information. Parents or patients who refuse to have information included in the CCRN or be contacted in the future will still be able to enter clinical cancer research studies.

    Bethesda, Maryland

  • Experimental drug and combination chemotherapy to treat infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement

    “Does the addition of azacitidine increase the ability of chemotherapy to kill leukemia cells?”

    open to all eligible people

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With various types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2) inhibitor AMG-232 when given together with decitabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back, does not respond to treatment, or is newly diagnosed. MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 and decitabine together may work better than decitabine alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Experimental medicine, Carfilzomib and chemotherapy treatment for newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma

    “Study looking at side effects and best dose of the study medicine, carfilzomib with approved chemotherapy for treatment of leukemia patients”

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with the hyperfractionated (hyper)-cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone (CVAD) chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.

    Sacramento, California

  • First in-Human Trial of the Experimental Drug AMG 176 in Relapsed or Refractory (re-occurring) Cancer of the Blood Systems

    “This study will look at which doses of the study drug AMG 176 are safe for people to take.”

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    At least one dose level of AMG 176 will achieve acceptable safety and tolerability in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and subjects with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute...

    open to eligible people ages 2-21

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Nivolumab in eliminating remaining cancer cells and preventing relapse of acute myeloid leukemia in remission after chemotherapy

    “Can a type of immunotherapy, (monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab), block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works in eliminating any remaining cancer cells and preventing cancer from returning in patients with acute myeloid leukemia that had a decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms of cancer after receiving chemotherapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy to treat newly diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia /Myelodysplastic Syndrome patients with Down syndrome

    “Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups according to how they respond to the first course of treatment”

    open to eligible people ages up to 3 years

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Long Term Health in Children and Adolescents With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 8-15

    This randomized clinical trial studies how well web-based physical activity intervention works in improving long term health in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia that shows a decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms. Regular physical activity after receiving treatment for cancer may help to maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels and overall health.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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