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Leukemia clinical trials at UC Davis

26 research studies open to eligible people

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  • A Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Adult Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (r/r ALL) (ZUMA-3)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objectives of this study are to determine the safety and efficacy of brexucabtagene autoleucel (KTE-X19) in adult participants with relapsed/refractory (r/r) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of a New Investigational Drug Combination in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This research is being done to assess the therapeutic activity of a promising combination (azacitidine and venetoclax) versus conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy in induction-eligible patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This study involves the following: - Venetoclax and azacitidine (investigational combination) - Cytarabine and idarubicin or daunorubicin (per standard of care) or Liposomal daunorubicin and cytarabine (per standard of care)

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of a Potential New Treatment for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This open-label, entry-into-human (EIH) study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics of RO7283420. Escalating doses of RO7283420 will be administered to participants with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in order to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or recommended Phase II dose (RP2D).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of CFI-400945 With or Without Azacitidine or Decitabine in Patients With AML, MDS or CMML

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to test the safety of an investigational drug called CFI-400945 alone and in combination with azacitidine or decitabine

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Chemotherapy Drugs CC-486, Lenalidomide, and Obinutuzumab for the Treatment of Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/Ib trial investigates the side effects of CC-486 and how well it works in combination with lenalidomide and obinutuzumab in treating patients with CD20 positive B-cell lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as CC-486, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and may also interfere with the development of tiny blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. Obinutuzumab is a type of antibody therapy that targets and attaches to the CD20 proteins found on follicular lymphoma cells as well as some healthy blood cells. Once attached to the CD20 protein the obinutuzumab is thought to work in different ways, including by helping the immune system destroy the cancer cells and by destroying the cancer cells directly. Giving CC-486 with lenalidomide and obinutuzumab may improve response rates, quality, and duration, and minimize adverse events in patients with B-cell lymphoma.

    Sacramento, California

  • A Study of CPX-351 Plus Enasidenib for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial evaluates how well CPX-351 and enasidenib work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by IHD2 mutation. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving CPX-351 and enasidenib may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Engineered Donor Grafts (TregGraft) for Allogeneic Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies (blood cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of an engineered donor graft ("TregGraft"/"Orca-T", a T-cell-Depleted Graft With Additional Infusion of Conventional T Cells and Regulatory T Cells) in participants undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Combination of CPX-351 and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin For Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin when given together with CPX-351 in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after it was previously in remission. CPX-351 is a chemotherapy, which works in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 (transmembrane receptor) positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving CPX-351 and gemtuzumab ozogamicin may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental FT-2102 in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome (types of blood system cancer)

    “This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Phase 1/2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 (olutasidenib) activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 8 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (olutasidenib) (as a single agent) and FT-2102 (olutasidenib) + azacitidine (combination) on various AML/MDS disease states.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Inotuzumab Ozogamicin for Younger Patients With CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of Experimental Medicine Crenolanib vs Midostaurin For Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    A phase III randomized multi-center study designed to compare the efficacy of crenolanib with that of midostaurin when administered following induction chemotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in newly diagnosed AML subjects with FLT3 mutation. About 510 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either crenolanib in addition to standard first line treatment of AML (chemotherapy and if eligible, transplantation) (arm A) or midostaurin and standard treatment (arm B). Potentially eligible subjects will be registered and tested for the presence of FLT3 mutation. Once the FLT3 mutation status is confirmed and additional eligibility is established, subject will be randomized and enter into the treatment phase.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of IO-202 as Monotherapy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To assess safety and tolerability at increasing dose levels of IO-202 as monotherapy and in combination with Azacitidine in successive cohorts of participants with relapsed or refractory AML with monocytic differentiation and CMML in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) and select the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and dose schedule as monotherapy and combination therapy.

    Davis, California and other locations

  • A Study of Oral LY3410738 in Advanced Hematologic Malignancies With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multi-center Phase 1 study of LY3410738, an oral, covalent IDH inhibitor, in patients with IDH1 and/or IDH2-mutant advanced hematologic malignancies who may have received standard therapy

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Study of T Cell Therapy in Adults With B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase Ib/II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous T cells engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD19 in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Adding Inotuzumab to Chemotherapy for Young Adults With Newly Diagnosed Leukemia

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18-39

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine With Venetoclax for Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Prior Hypomethylating Agent Failure

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial evaluates the effect of azacitidine or decitabine and venetoclax in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has not been treated before (treatment naive) or has come back (relapsed). Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Combination Treatment for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    “Do you have b-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and have relapsed or are no longer responding or benefiting from the treatment?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and blinatumomab work in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sacramento, California

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With various types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of navtemadlin when given together with decitabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent), does not respond to treatment (refractory), or is newly diagnosed. Navtemadlin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving navtemadlin and decitabine together may work better than decitabine alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute...

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate works in combination with two different chemotherapy regimens in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Imatinib mesylate has been shown to improve outcomes in children and adolescents with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) ALL when given with strong chemotherapy, but the combination has many side effects. This trial is testing whether a different chemotherapy regimen may work as well as the stronger one but have fewer side effects when given with imatinib. The trial is also testing how well the combination of chemotherapy and imatinib works in another group of patients with a type of ALL that is similar to Ph+ ALL. This type of ALL is called "ABL-class fusion positive ALL", and because it is similar to Ph+ ALL, is thought it will respond well to the combination of agents used to treat Ph+ ALL.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing an Experimental Anti-Cancer Drug M3814 for Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of M3814 when given in combination with mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). M3814 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving M3814 in combination with mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine may lower the chance of the acute myeloid leukemia growing or spreading.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Testing the Effects of Early Treatment With Venetoclax and Obinutuzumab in Lymphocytic Leukemia

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares early treatment with venetoclax and obinutuzumab versus delayed treatment with venetoclax and obinutuzumab in patients with newly diagnosed high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Venetoclax is in a class of medications called B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) inhibitors. It may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Starting treatment with the venetoclax and obinutuzumab early (before patients have symptoms) may have better outcomes for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma compared to starting treatment with the venetoclax and obinutuzumab after patients show symptoms.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Uproleselan, Azacitidine, and Venetoclax for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    “Volunteer for research and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial evaluates the side effects of uproleselan, azacitidine, and venetoclax in treating older or unfit patients with treatment naive acute myeloid leukemia. Uproleselan may help block the formation of growths that may become cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Giving uproleselan with azacitidine and venetoclax may help kill more cancer cells.

    Sacramento, California

  • Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Long Term Health in Children and Adolescents With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 8-16

    This randomized clinical phase III trial studies how well web-based physical activity intervention works in improving long term health in children and adolescents with cancer. Regular physical activity after receiving treatment for cancer may help to maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels and overall health.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

  • Enrollment on the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) of the Children s Oncology Group

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Background: - The Children s Oncology Group has established a research network, the Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN), to collect information about children with cancer and other conditions that are benign but involve abnormal cell growth in order to help doctors and scientists better understand childhood cancer. The CCRN's goal is to collect clinical information about every child diagnosed with cancer and similar conditions in the United States and Canada, to allow researchers to study patterns, characteristics, and causes of childhood cancer. The information can also help researchers study the causes of childhood cancer. To expand the CCRN, parents of children who have been diagnosed with cancer will be asked to provide information about themselves and their child for research purposes. Objectives: - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer to enter their names and certain information concerning their child into the Childhood Cancer Research Network. - To obtain informed consent from parents (and the child, when appropriate) of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults newly diagnosed with cancer for permission to be contacted in the future to consider participating in non-therapeutic and prevention research studies involving the parents and/or the child. Eligibility: - Parents of children who have been seen at or treated by a hospital that is a member of the Children s Oncology Group. Design: - Parents will provide permission to have personal information sent from their child s hospital to the CCRN, including the child and parents' names; child's gender, birth date, race, and ethnicity; information about the disease; and the treating institution. - Parents will also give permission for CCRN to contact the diagnostic laboratory to obtain specific information about the tumor or cancer cells. - Parents will be asked if they are willing to be contacted in the future to consider participating in CCRN research studies, and will provide contact information (name, home address, and telephone number) to be entered in the CCRN. - Parents or patients who change their minds about having information available in the CCRN can ask the treatment institution to restrict access to the identifying information. Parents or patients who refuse to have information included in the CCRN or be contacted in the future will still be able to enter clinical cancer research studies.

    Bethesda, Maryland

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    Sacramento, California and other locations

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