Summary

Eligibility
for people ages 18-65 (full criteria)
Healthy Volunteers
healthy people welcome
Location
at Davis, California
Dates
study started
estimated completion

Description

Summary

Dietary pulses, including beans, chickpeas, and lentils, are high in soluble fiber with potential benefits to human health: Pulses are moderate energy density foods, low in fat and high in dietary protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Moderate pulse consumption is associated with improvements in glycemic control and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Measuring pulse consumption in humans is difficult, due to limitations in current methods for dietary assessment which are largely based on dietary recalls that are subject to reporting bias. Robust tools for pulse intake assessment are needed, and biomarkers of dietary pulse intake are one approach to solve this problem. The goal of this human feeding study is evaluate the presence of biomarkers of dietary pulses in human subjects.

Official Title

Identifying the Role of Pulses in a Healthful Diet: Metabolomic Signatures of Dietary Pulses and Their Benefits on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

Details

Dietary pulses, including beans, chickpeas, and lentils, are high in soluble fiber with potential benefits to human health: Pulses are moderate energy density foods, low in fat and high in dietary protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Moderate pulse consumption is associated with improvements in glycemic control and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, only 5% of the U.S. population currently meet recommended fiber intakes. As pulses are an excellent source of fiber, increasing their levels in the American diet could lead to demonstrable health benefits in the population, including positive influences on glucose regulation. Additionally, pulse impacts on the gut microbiome may be responsible for reported health benefits. While diet has direct impacts on health, these effects can be mediated by the microbiome, and dietary fiber is a key determinant of this interaction. The fermentation of soluble fiber by specific microbial species lead to the production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) including propionate and butyrate which are positively associated with insulin sensitivity. In general, elevated colonic SCFA production is associated with improved glucose regulation, appetite modulation, and immune system modulation. The overall goal of this research is to evaluate how pulse digestion and microbial fermentation influence the circulating and excreted metabolome. To achieve this goal, a randomized controlled feeding study including one week of control, low pulse and high pulse diet will be provided to participants. Metabolomics will be used to identify biomarkers or signatures for pulse enriched diets in urine and plasma. In addition, researchers will investigate dietary pulse related changes in the microbiome community and short chain fatty acid production in fecal samples.

Keywords

Body Weight Dietary pulses Urine biomarkers Microbiome Short chain fatty acids Plasma biomarkers Fecal biomarkers Beans Lentils Controlled feeding Intervention Chickpeas Metabolomics Low Pulse diet High Pulse diet

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 18-65

  • Body Mass Index (BMI) 18-30 kg/m2
  • Willingness to provide urine and stool and have blood drawn

You CAN'T join if...

  • Active participation in another research study
  • Tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus (COV)-2 within the past 10 days
  • Been in close contact with a SARS COV-2 positive person within the past 14 days
  • Unwillingness to consume pulses or pulse-related products
  • Fasting glucose ≥120 mg/dL
  • Fasting triglyceride ≥400 mg/dL
  • LDL-cholesterol ≥160 mg/dL
  • Blood Pressure (BP): Systolic BP ≥140 mmHg or Diastolic BP ≥90 mmHg
  • Current use of dietary supplements and/or unwillingness to cease intake of dietary supplements
  • Vegan or vegetarian lifestyle or any other dietary restrictions that would interfere with consuming the intervention foods and beverages (including dietary intolerances, allergies and sensitivities)
  • Unwillingness to consume intervention foods and beverages
  • Engage in
  • More than moderate drinking (> 1 drink serving per day for women or >2 drink servings per day for men).
  • Binge drinking (4 drinks within two hours).
  • Excessive intake of caffeine containing products (excessive defined as ≥ 400mg/day)
  • Diagnosis of disordered eating or eating disorder
  • Recent diagnosis of any of the following or measurement on screening lab tests
  • Anemia (hemoglobin <11.7g/dL)
  • Abnormal liver function
  • Liver Enzymes that are >200% of upper limit (alanine aminotransferase (ALT) upper limit is 43 U/L or aspartate aminotransferase (AST) upper limit is 54 U/L)
  • History of any of the following
  • Gastric bypass surgery
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or other GI conditions that would interfere with consuming the intervention foods
  • Active cancer in the past three years excluding squamous or basal cell carcinomas of the skin that have been handled medically by local excision
  • Other serious medical conditions
  • Recent dental work or have conditions of the oral cavity that would interfere with consuming the intervention foods and beverages
  • Long term use of antibiotics
  • Taking any over the counter or prescribed medication for any of the following
  • Elevated lipids or glucose
  • High blood pressure
  • Weight loss
  • Are pregnant, planning to become pregnant within the duration of the study or breastfeeding.

Location

  • USDA ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center
    Davis California 95616 United States

Details

Status
accepting new patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
USDA, Western Human Nutrition Research Center
Links
Sign up for this study
ID
NCT04887584
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated